Media Information

 
 
 
Collection name:
Sion College manuscripts
Record:
Identifier:
SionL40.2L26
Title:
GILES OF ROME
Description:
De regimine principum', a guide for princes by Aegidius Romanus, also known as Egidius Romanus, or Giles of Rome (c.1243-1316). This manuscript was written in England, with a series of English coats of arms. Ownership inscription at f. 1r: 'Liber illustrissimus Principis Ducis Gloucestr', the last three words erased, but legible by ultra-violet light. This refers to Richard, Duke of Gloucester, afterwards Richard III. Anne Sutton argued that this manuscript was written towards the end of the second quarter of the 15th century, commissioned by Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland (d. 1455), and passed subsequently to the future Richard III. This was based on the appearance of Percy's arms at f. 51v and the strong northern bias of the heraldry. Charles Briggs (who did not refer to Anne Sutton's conclusions) argued that the manuscript was commissioned by Richard, 3rd Duke of York (1411-1460) and passed to the latter's son, the future Richard III. This was based on the series of coats of arms identifying the manuscript with the house of York and its affinity. See Publication Note field. f. 1r. Begins: 'Ex regia ac sanctissima prosapia...'. f. 1r. Initial letter incorporating a coat of arms: Edward the Confessor impaling France modern and England quarterly, with a crest of a lion passant or on a cap of maintenance, representing Richard II. Full border decorated with foliage. In the right hand margin a coat of arms: England, a label three points azure, each point charged with three fleur-de-lis or (?), with a crest as in the initial letter, representing the old house of Lancaster. Added at the foot of the page are three ill-executed coats of arms, as yet unidentified, described by Sutton as: i. sable three escallops argent (?), for Strickland or Jervaulx Abbey; ii. sable a chevron argent (?); iii. per chevron argent and azure, three escallops countercoloured (?). f. 6v. Initial letter incorporating a coat of arms: or, an eagle displayed argent; identified by Sir Anthony Wagner as the King of the Romans, and by Anne Sutton as St. John of Beverley. f. 22r. Initial letter incorporating a coat of arms: azure, a cross fleury between four lions rampant, all azure; representing the Benedictine Priory of St. Cuthbert, Durham. f. 27v. Initial letter incorporating a coat of arms: or, nine mascles gules, 3, 3, 2, 1; probably, according to Anne Sutton, for Sir William Fitzherbert (d. 1154), Archbishop of York. f. 32r. Initial letter incorporating a coat of arms: argent, a cross gules; representing St. George. f. 42r. Initial letter incorporating a coat of arms: France modern and England quarterly, a label of three points argent, each point charged with three (roundels gules?), in pretence a shield of Mortimer. According to Sir Anthony Wagner this represents Richard of York, Earl of Cambridge [d. 1415], but Anne Sutton suggests his son, Richard, Duke of York [1411-1460]. f. 51v. Initial letter incorporating a coat of arms: quarterly, 1 and 4, or, a lion rampant azure; 2 and 3 gules three luces argent, impaling gules, a saltire argent, ie. Percy impaling Neville. This represents Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland (1393-1455), who married Eleanor Neville in 1414. f. 60v. Initial letter incorporating a coat of arms: argent, a cross gules, in the dexter chief quarter a sword erect also gules; representing London. f. 68r. Initial letter incorporating a coat of arms: argent, on a cross gules five lions passant guardant or; representing York. f. 84r. Initial letter incorporating a coat of arms: quarterly 1 and 4, or, an eagle displayed argent; 2 and 3argent, three bars wavy azure a beaver or with ite head turned biting its fur. According to Sutton this represents Beverley (with the tinctures in error). Reproduced in Briggs, p. 69. f. 84v. Initial letter incorporating a coat of arms: azure, three crowns or; representing St. Edmund. Sutton suggests this may be in error for azure, three crowns in pale or (representing Hull). f. 96r. Ends: '...benedictus in secula seculorum. Amen'. ff. 96r-100r. Index, Absinencia-Zelus, in the same hand as the main text. Begins with an explanatory note: 'Subscriptam tabulam super libros venerabilis egidii de regimine principum volens advertere...'. ff. 100v-101v. Blank. One leaf missing after f. 67.
Description:
Leather binding, 406 x 295 mm., rebacked. Metal clasps. 17th century. Parchment leaves (except ff. i-ii, 102, paper flyleaves), 400 x 280 mm. Written space 290 x 190 mm. 2 cols. 52 lines. Collation: 1-11(8) (9 wants 4 after f. 67); 12(10); 13(4). Written in set secretary hand of a professional sort. Initials: (i) ff. 1r, 6v, 22r, 27v, 32r, 42r, 51v, 60v, 68r, 84r, 84v, 96r, in pink or blue on gold grounds, with prolongations in colours and gold which on f. 1 form a continuous border; (ii) 4-line and, on ff. 96-100, 3-line, blue with red ornament. All the initials of type i, except that on f. 96, contain an armorial shield, and four shields are in the border on f. 1r. All the shields are different. Sir Anthony Wagner informed N.R. Ker that: the shield in the initial on f. 1r 'of Edward the Confessor impaling France modern and England with the royal crest over can only be meant for Richard II'; other shields in initials are (f. 6v) the King of the Romans, (f. 22r) the Benedictines of Durham, (f. 32r) St. George, (f. 42r) Richard of York, Earl of Cambridge, with Mortimer in pretence, (f. 51v) Henry, Earl of Northumberland, impaling his wife, Eleanor Neville, (f. 60v) the City of London, (f. 84r [sic, but f. 84v is probably meant]) St. Edmund; the shield in the right-hand border on f. 1r 'must, I suppose, be intended for the old House of Lancaster'. Secundo folio 'quis plene'.
Date:
15th century
Language:
Latin
Rights:
LPL